Printing Glossary

A

A Sheet: The reference used for a carbonless top sheet of a multipart set.

Absorbency: The extent to which a paper will take in liquid. 

Accordion Fold: Zigzag type of fold in which a sheet of paper has two or more parallel folds that open in the manner of an accordion; also known as fanfold and zigzag fold.

Acid-free Paper:  Paper produced from pulp containing little or no acid. Acid-free paper has a greater endurance than regular paper and is also known as alkaline paper, archival paper, neutral pH paper, permanent paper and thesis paper.

Adhesive Binding: A generic term for bookbinding which uses adhesives along the backbone edges of assembled loose leaves to secure them together into a pad or book.

Adhesive: A hot-melt or cold-set glue used in bookbinding.

AI: File format that is native to Adobe Illustrator and used to represent vector based drawings.

Alkaline Paper: Paper produced from pulp containing little or no acid. Alkaline paper has a greater endurance than regular paper and is also known as acid-free paper, archival paper, neutral pH paper, permanent paper and thesis paper.

Archival Paper: Paper produced from pulp containing little or no acid. Archival paper has a greater endurance than regular paper and is also known as acid-free paper, alkaline paper, neutral pH paper, permanent paper and thesis paper.

Artwork: Graphical design of work intended for print.

Author's Alterations: Changes requested by client after work has already been approved.  This would usually entail additional costs.


B

Back up: Printing the second side of a printed sheet.

Band: Securing a set quantity of a product with a rubber band.

Bind: To fasten sheets together with wire, thread, glue, or other means.

Bindery: The finishing department of a print shop.

Binding edge: The edge of a stack of collated sheets where the binding will be done.

Biodegradable: Matter which is able to break down or decompose rapidly under natural conditions and processes.

Bitmap: Graphic composed of a series of square dots.

Blanket Cylinder: A cylinder covered with a reinforced rubber sheet which transfers the image to the paper.

Bleach: A chemical treatment used to whiten, brighten and improve the performance of pulp.

Bleed: Printing that extends to the edge of the sheet after trimming. The bleed area is the excess margin of artwork, at the edge of a sheet, which can be trimmed without leaving a border.

Blind Emboss: An image pressed into a sheet without ink or foil.

Blister Pack: A transparent, moulded piece of plastic sealed to a sheet of cardboard, to package and display an item of merchandise.

Block Printing: Method of printing from raised surface; also called letterpress.

Blotter: Absorbent paper, made from wood pulp or cotton fibre, used to remove excess water from printing paper and to help dry finished products.

Blurb: A description or commentary of an author or book content positioned on the back of a book.

Bond paper: Strong durable paper grade commonly used for letterheads and business forms.

Book Jacket: The paper wrapper placed around a case bound book; also called Dust Jacket.

Bulk pack: Boxing printed products without wrapping or banding.

Bulk: Thickness of paper relative to its basic weight.

Burst Bind:  To bind by forcing glue into notches punched along the spines of sections to fasten them together. 

Butt: Joining images without overlapping.


C

C1S and C2S: Abbreviations for coated one side and coated two sides.

Calendar: The process of passing paper through rollers during manufacture.

Carbon Paper: A thin paper coated on one side with colouring agent or carbon black, used to transmit artwork through pressure to the sheet(s) below.

Carbonless Paper: Paper coated on the underside with colourless dye, used to transmit artwork to the sheet(s) below without the use of carbon; also known as NCR (No Carbon Required).

Case bind: A type of binding used in making hard cover books using glue.

Case bound: A hardback book made with a stiff board cover.

Cast coated: Coated paper with a high gloss reflective finish.

Character: A letter, number, space, punctuation mark, or symbol in typesetting.

Clean Edge: Refers to a very fine perforation line which replicates the effect of a guillotine cut edge, also known as Micro-Perf.

CMYK: Abbreviation for the four process colours: cyan, magenta, yellow and key (black).

Coat: A varnish or lacquer applied to a printed product to provide protection or enhance appearance; also known as laminate.

Coil bind: A method of binding that involves winding a spiral wire or plastic through pre-punched holes along the edge of collated papers; also known as spiral bind.

Collate: A finishing term for assembling loose leaves in a particular order.

Colour matching system: A system of formulated ink colours to facilitate colour accuracies.

Colour separations: The process of preparing artwork by separating it into the four primary printing colours, CMYK.

Colour Correction: Method used to improve the reproduction of the original colour.

Comb bind:  A method of binding that involves inserting a flexible plastic comb through pre-punched holes along the edge of collated papers.

Composition Proof: A proof showing the complete arrangement of the final copy, graphics, type and colours.

Compression: Reducing a file size, often the image’s quality is affected as a result.

Continuous Stationery: Paper supplied in reel form, which will usually include specialised Print Finishing such as perforations, and is commonly used for invoices, statements and similar documents, where it may be fan-folded.

Copy: Text.


Cover paper: A heavy printing paper used to cover books, make presentation folders, etc.

Crash number: Numbering a multipart set by pressing an image on the first sheet which is transferred to all parts of the printed set.

Crease: To mechanically impress a mark into thick paper or board to enable it to be folded without cracking, also known as score. 

Crop marks: Marks indicating where a printed sheet will be trimmed.


D

Data Compression: Technique of reducing the file size of electronic images and files, to allow it to be processed or transmitted more quickly.

Data Decompression: Technique of expanding a compressed file to its original size.

Deboss: A process of imprinting an image by applying pressure to the front side of a material, giving it an indented effect.

Densitometer: Instrument used to measure density.

Density Range: The measure of tonal values derived by calculating the difference in density from the shadow tones to the highlight tones of an image.

Density: The degree of colour or darkness of an image.

Desktop Publishing (DTP): The use of personal computers, or workstations, to design and produce digital documents.

Die Cut:  To give paper a specific shape by using a metal die.

Die: A specialized tool used for cutting, scoring, stamping, embossing or debossing.

Digital Paper: Paper specifically designed for digital printing technology.

Digital Printing - The process of printing directly from a computer file without using conventional printing plates.

Digital Proofing: A proof that has been created by the use of digital files rather than from plates.

Dot: A single point or smallest part of an image that is identifiable.

Double-faced Paper: A paper made by pasting two different thinner sheets together, resulting in paper with a different colour or finish on both sides. This is also known as duplex paper and two-tone paper.

Download: To receive files from a remote computer.

DPI: Abbreviation for Dots Per Inch; a unit of measure used to describe the resolution of printed images. A higher DPI image will result in better resolution and greater amount of visible detail.

Drill: Drilling or punching of holes into a printed matter.

DTP: Abbreviation for Desktop Publishing; the use of personal computers, or workstations, to design and produce digital documents.

Dull Finish: A non-glossy finish that is slightly smoother than matt.

Dummy: A mock layout created to simulate the final product.

Duotone: Images using a colour-separation printing scheme, of just two of the four primary printing colours (CMYK).

Duplex Paper: A paper made by pasting two different thinner sheets together, resulting in paper with a different colour or finish on both sides. This is also known as double-faced paper and two-tone paper.

Dust Jacket: The paper wrapper placed around a case bound book; also called Book Jacket.

Dye: A coloured substance.


E

Eight sheet: A poster measuring 60 x 80in (153 x 203cm) traditionally constructed of eight individual sheets.

Electronic Printing: A printing method that creates images using electrostatic charges, rather than by pressing ink onto a plate. This method is used by photocopiers, inkjet and laser printers.

Electrostatic printing: A printing process that uses electrostatic charges to transfer images onto a surface which then attracts toner in only the charged areas. The toner is bonded to the sheet by heat.

Emboss: A process of imprinting an image by applying pressure to the back side of a material, giving it a raised effect.

Embossed Finish: Textured paper with a raised or depressed surface.

Emulsion: The non-shiny side of photographic film.

Encapsulated Post Script (EPS): A high-resolution, electronic file format that can contain vector graphics or bitmap images.

End Sheet: The sheet that attaches the inside pages of a case bound book to its cover.

Engrave: A method that uses pressure to create raised letters and images on the front of the page and indentations on the back.

EPS: Abbreviation for Encapsulated Post Script; a high-resolution, electronic file format that can contain vector graphics or bitmap images.

Estimate: An approximate price provided to a customer, based on the given specifications.

Etch: Carving done on plates and film using chemicals to create an image.


F

Fanfold: Zigzag type of fold in which a sheet of paper has two or more parallel folds that open in the manner of an accordion; also known as accordion fold and zigzag fold.

Fastness: Resistance of colour to fading.

Felt Finish: A soft woven texture of an uncoated paper.

Fifth Colour:  Ink colour used in addition to the four needed by four-colour process.

Film Laminate: Thin sheet of plastic bonded to a printed product for protection or increased gloss.

Finish: The general surface properties of paper, including its lustre or texture.

Finished Size: Size of product after it has been folded and trimmed.

Finishing: Post-press operations such as binding or folding.

Flat Colour: Printing using only one colour ink.

Flat Size: Size of product before it has been folded.

Flexography: A method of printing that can be applied to irregular surfaces such as aluminium cans, coffee mugs, or corrugated cardboard.

Flood: To completely cover a printed page with ink, varnish, or plastic coating.

Flush Cover: A cover trimmed to the same size as the inside pages.

Flyer: A small promotional leaflet.

Flyleaf: Unprinted pages (other than the end sheets) which may appear at the front or back of a book. 

Foil Emboss:  A method of printing that combines foil stamping and embossing to create a special effect.

Foil Stamp: The process of applying a shiny metallic foil to a specified area to create a special visual effect; also known as hot stamp.

Foldout: A folded sheet larger than the publication into which it is bound, often used for a map or chart.

Format: Particular specifications of a printed product, including its size, style, type and layout.

Four standard process colours: The CMYK colours: cyan (blue), magenta (red) yellow, and black.

Four-colour Process Printing: A colour printing method that utilizes four different plates for each of the four primary printing colours (CMYK). 

French Fold: A sheet which has been printed on one side only and then folded twice in right angles to form a four page uncut section.

Full-scale Black: A black separation that has dots printing in all areas of the image, including the highlight and shadow areas.


G

Galley Proof: Proof of typeset text before it has been laid out or graphical elements added.

Gate Fold:  A fold, where the right and left sides of the paper are folded exactly in half towards the gutter so that their edges meet in the centre.

GIF: Abbreviation for Graphic Interchange Format: a popular file format for web graphics.

Gild: Applying gold pigment to the edges of pages in a closed book.

Gloss Ink: Ink with a shiny appearance.

Gloss: A shiny, lustrous finish.

Gold block: The process of applying a shiny gold metallic foil to a specified area to create a special visual effect.

Grade: The category of paper based on its quality and finish.

Gradient: A gradual changing between two colours or from dark to light.

Grain Direction: The direction in which the majority of the paper’s fibres lie.

Grams per Square Metre (GSM): The unit of measurement for paper weight.

Graphic Design: The art of conveying a visual message with the arrangement of colour, text and illustrations.

Graphic: Visual elements used to enhance text copy.

Graphics Interchange Format (GIF): A popular file format for web graphics.

Greyscale: The palette that scales from black to white through various shades of grey.

Groundwood Paper: Non-durable paper made form groundwood pulp used for newspapers, catalogues and other forms of non-permanent printed materials.

GSM: Abbreviation for Grams per Square Metre; the unit of measurement for paper weight.

Gummed: An adhesive that bonds when moisture is applied to it, such as on an envelope flap.

Gutter: The margin in the centre of a two-page spread where the pages meet.


H

 Halftone: A printed image that uses dots to simulate the tones between light and dark.   

Hard copy: A printed proof.

Hardback: A case bound book with a stiff board cover.

Header: The margin at the top of a page.

Hemp: Substance from a common type of plant cultivated for industrial use.

Hexachrome: A six-colour printing process that enhances the colour range and accuracy of print over traditional four-colour process printing.

High Resolution: An image that has a lot of detail and is generally of high quality.

High-key Photo: Photo comprised of predominantly highlight areas.

Highlight: The lightest areas of a photography or illustration.

Hot Melt Adhesive: A solid thermoplastic material that liquefies when heated re-solidifies to form a bond, when cooled.

Hot Stamp: The process of applying a shiny metallic foil to a specified area to create a special visual effect; also known as foil stamp.

Hue: The appearance, brightness, and saturation of a colour.


I

Image area: The area within the margins of a page that can be printed.

Index Board: A stiff, economical card, with a smooth finish.

Imposition: Positioning printed page so they will appear in their correct sequence after they are folded and bound.

Imprint: To print anew on a printed sheet by running it through a press again.

Ink Jet Paper: Paper that provides optimal performance when running through an ink jet printer.

Ink Jet Printing: Printing process by which jets of ink are projected onto a sheet by a computer program.

Insert: A loose printed paper positioned into a publication.  

Intaglio Printing: The collective term for the print making techniques that encompasses engraving and etching methods.

ISBN: Abbreviation for International Standard Book Number; a reference number assigned to a published work, usually found on the back of the title page.

Ivory board: A smooth high white board.


J

Job Number: A number assigned to a specific printing project to assist in tracking and record keeping.

Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPG): a compressed file format.

JPEG: Abbreviation for Joint Photographic Experts Group; a compressed file format


K

Kern: Adjusting the lateral space between characters.

Keyline Rules: Guide lines to indicate the position of halftones on a page.

Kiss die cut: To die cut the top layer, without the backing, of self-adhesive paper.


L

Laid Paper: Paper that has a ribbed texture.

Laminate: A varnish or lacquer applied to a printed product to provide protection or enhance appearance; also known as laminate.

Landscape: Positioning a page so that its width is greater than its height.

Laser Paper: Paper that provides optimal performance when running through a laser printer.

Laser Print: A digital printing method that uses a laser beam to create an image on a drum, by the use of electrostatic printing technology.

Layout: The arrangement of text and graphic to give a suitable visual appearance.

Leaf: One side of a page in a publication.

Letter Fold:  Two parallel folds creating three panels that allow a sheet to fit a business envelope.

Letterpress: Method of printing from raised surface; also called block printing.

Linen Finish: Paper finish that simulates the pattern of linen cloth.

Lithography: The process of printing from a plate, on which the image to be printed is ink-receptive and the blank area is ink repellent.  This is then transferred onto paper resulting in a premium quality print. Most lithography is offset lithography in which the image is transferred from the plate to a rubber blanket cylinder, and then printed (offset) from the blanket onto the paper.

Logo (Logotype): A company’s identifying symbol.

Loose Proof: Proof of a halftone or colour separation exclusive of the other elements from a page, as compared to composite proof.

Looseleaf Bind: Method of binding the allows the easy removal and insertion of pages in a publication.

Low Key Photo: Photo comprised of predominately shadow areas.

Low Resolution: An image that has little detail and is generally of poor quality.


M

Machine proof: Pre-press proof.

Magnetic Ink Character Recognition (MICR): A character recognition technology.

Magnetic ink: Magnetized ink that can be recognized by electronic machines, as used in cheque printing.

Manila hemp: A durable natural fibre.

Manila: A tough brown paper, traditionally made from Manila hemp, used to produce stationery and wrapping paper.

Margin: The blank space bordering the text or images on a page.

Match Print:  A proofing system for Four-colour-Process Printing.

Matt: A non-shiny, smooth finish.

Mechanical Bind: A generic term using for binding that does not require gluing, sewing or stitching; examples are comb, coil and ring.

Metallic Ink: Ink that simulates metal; these can be produced in a wide range of colours such as gold, silver, metallic blue etc.

Metallic Paper: Coated paper that simulates metal; these can be produced in a wide range of colours such as gold, silver, metallic blue etc.

MICR: Abbreviation for Magnetic Ink Character Recognition; a character recognition technology.

Middle tones (Mid tones): The tones in a photograph that are approximately halfway between its highlight and shadow areas.

Mircroperf: A very finely cut sharp perforated edge.

Monochrome: An image printed in a single ink colour.

Monospace: A font in which all characters occupy the same amount of horizontal width regardless of the character.

Mottle: Botchy printing resultant from unsuitable paper or ink.

Mounting board: A heavy-weight board used for mounting printed artwork.

MS (Manuscript): The original written or typewritten work of an author submitted for publication.

Multipart: A set of sheets, where the image on the first sheet is duplicated upon the sheets below via either carbon paper or carbonless paper; usually used for business forms such as invoices where the client and provider both want to retain a copy.


N

NCR: Abbreviation for No Carbon Required; paper coated on the underside with colourless dye, used to transmit artwork to the sheet(s) below without the use of carbon; also known as Carbonless Paper.

Neutral pH paper: Paper produced from pulp containing little or no acid. Neutral pH paper has a greater endurance than regular paper and is also known as acid-free paper, alkaline paper, archival paper, permanent paper and thesis paper.

Newsprint: A low grade paper used for printing newspapers or other documents not intended to be kept permanently; is also known as non-archival paper.

No Carbon Required (NCR): paper coated on the underside with colourless dye, used to transmit artwork to the sheet(s) below without the use of carbon; also known as Carbonless Paper.

Non-archival paper: A low grade paper used for printing newspapers or other documents, not intended to be kept permanently, is also known as newsprint.

Novelty Items: Free items, such as coasters, letter openers, mugs or balloons printed with an advertisers’ logo and used to promote their business.

Novelty Printing: Printing on novelty items, also known as promotional print.


O

Offset Printing: A printing technique, in which the inked image on a printing plate is impressed on a rubber cylinder and then transferred, i.e. offset, to paper or other material.

Offset paper: Paper that provides optimal performance when used for offset printing.

Opacity: Characteristic of paper that prevents a printed image showing through on the other side.

Overprint: Printing over an area already printed.

Overrun: Copies printed in excess of the quantity that was originally ordered.


P

Page: One side of a sheet; 2pp means two printed pages which is one sheet.

Pagination: Numerical sequence of pages in a book.

Panel: One side of a folded section in a leaflet or brochure.

Pantone Matching System (PMS): A widely used colour-matching system.

Papermaking: The process of making paper.

Parallel Fold: A fold that runs parallel to another fold or a particular edge, in a leaflet or brochure.

Perfect bind: An adhesive-binding method; hot-melt adhesive is applied to the spine of the book block before the cover is attached.

Perforate: Punching a line of very small holes so that paper can be torn more easily along a along a predetermined line.

Permanent paper: Paper produced from pulp containing little or no acid. Permanent paper has a greater endurance than regular paper and is also known as acid-free paper, alkaline paper, archival paper, neutral pH paper and thesis paper.

Pixel: Short for picture element; the smallest unit of a graphic image.

Pixelation: A low-resolution image in which the individual pixels comprise the image, are visible to the eye. A picture that this has happened to has been pixelated.

Plate: A metal, plastic or paper light-sensitive sheet, carrying an image to be reproduced using a printing press.

PMS: Abbreviation for Pantone Matching System; a widely used colour-match system.

PostScript: The computer language that describes the contents of a page.

Portrait: Positioning a page so that its height is greater than its width.

Pre-press: Procedures performed to prepare a job for printing.

Process colours: (CMYK); Cyan (blue), magenta (process red), yellow (process yellow), black (process black).

Proof:  A pre-production copy to check accuracy of layout, type, images and colour reproduction.

PSD: File format that is native to Adobe Photoshop and used to represent pixel based images.

Pulp: Fibre material from which paper is made.

Pulp board: A rough, highly absorbent board.


Q

Quotation: A price based on the specifications supplied for that order.


R

Rag pulp: Papermaking pulp made from textile waste such as cotton, hemp or flax.

Raised printing: A print finishing process that produces a raised image; also called thermography.

Ream: 500 sheets of paper.

Recycled Paper: Paper reproduced from waste pulp.

Relief Printing: A method of printing, from the raised portions of a cut or etched surface, such as block printing and letterpress.

Resolution: A measure of sharpness of an image.

Reverse Side Printing: Printing on the underside of a paper.

RGB: Abbreviation for red, green, blue; the colours used by a computer monitor to create colour images on the screen.

Roll label: Labels produced in a continuous roll form.


S

Saddle Stitch: A method of binding by stapling through the crease of collated folded sheets.

Satin Finish: Paper finish that simulates the texture of satin.

Score: To mechanically impress a mark into thick paper or board to enable it to be folded without cracking, also known as crease.

Screen Print: A method of printing by forcing ink through a fine screen of fabric; this technique can be applied to a wide range of surfaces, including paper, fabric, metal and plastic.

Security Paper: Paper which includes identification features such as metallic strips and watermarks, used on checks and other security sensitive documents.

Self Cover: A publication using the same paper weight for the cover as the inner pages.

Shadows: The darkest areas of a photograph or illustration.     

Side stitch: A method of binding by stapling through collated unfolded sheets along the binding edge.

Signature: Printed sheet folded to become part of a publication.

Specifications: A precise description of the requirements for a print order.

Spine: The binding edge of a publication.

Spiral Bind: A method of binding that involves winding a spiral wire or plastic through pre-punched holes along the edge of collated papers; also known as coil bind.

Spot Colour: Ink made from a single colour exclusive from the four process colours.

Spot Varnish: Varnish applied to specified parts of a printed product for a special effect.

Spread: Two facing pages.

Stock Paper: Popular sizes, weights and colours of papers.


T

Tack: The technical measure of the stickiness of glue or ink.

Tagged Image File Format (TIFF): A graphic file format especially suited for representing large bitmaps.

Template: A standard layout.

Text paper: Quality paper suitable for text books or text brochures. 

Thermography: A print finishing process, which involves heating thermal powder that is spread upon wet ink which is then hardened above the printed surface to produce a gloss raised image; also called raised printing. 

Thermoplastic: A plastic that melts to a liquid when heated, and then solidifies when it is cooled.

Thesis paper: Paper produced from pulp containing little or no acid. Thesis paper has a greater endurance than regular paper and is also known as acid-free paper, alkaline paper, archival paper, neutral pH paper and permanent paper.

TIFF: Abbreviation for Tagged Image File Format; a graphic file format, especially suited for representing large bitmaps.

Toner: The powder or liquid ink that forms the image in electrostatic printing.

Transparent ink: Translucent ink that allows the colour beneath to show through.

Trim Size: The size of the printed material after it has been trimmed to specification.

Trumatch: A widely used colour-matching system.

Turnaround time: The amount of time it takes to complete a printing order.

Typographical Error (Typo): An error in the typeset copy.

Typography: The design and planning of type in artwork.


U

Unbleached: Paper or pulp which has not been treated with bleaching agents. 

Upload: To transmit files to a remote computer.

UV Varnish: A liquid varnish applied after printing and then bonded with an ultraviolet (UV) light. This technique can be used either as an overall finish to give a high gloss finish, or applied as a spot varnish.


V

Variable data: Data which is changed from one printed piece to the next, as used in direct mailing and business forms or invoices.

Varnish: A clear liquid applied to printed surfaces for to enhance appearance or for protection.

Vector Graphics: The use of geometrical elements, such as points, lines, curves, and shapes to represent images.  

Vellum Finish:  A smooth cream finish.

Velo Bind: A method of binding that involves attaching a strip containing prongs around the binding edge to clamp and secure the pages together.

Vinyl: A tough durable plastic sheet, used for printing posters, suitable for outdoor use.


W

Watermark: Symbol or trademark manufactured into the paper pulp, visible when paper is held to light.  

Web printing press: A press that uses long rolls of paper, as opposed to precut sheets of paper.

Wire O bind: A method of binding, by inserting double loops of wire through pre-punched holes that will allow the publication to be opened 360º.

Wire stitch: Saddle stitch or wire stitch.

Woodfree Paper: Paper which contains little or no wood pulp.

Wood pulp: Papermaking Pulp made from wood. 

Wove paper: A standard paper with a smooth finish.


X

Xerography: A printing method using electrostatic printing technology to print an image from which subsequent copies are reproduced.

x-height The height of lower case letters, without their ascenders or descenders, which is the height of the letter x.


Z

Zigzag fold: Zigzag type of fold in which a sheet of paper has two or more parallel folds that open in the manner of an accordion; also known as accordion fold and fanfold

ZIP: A file that contains one or more files that have been compressed

Order & upload artwork Within 02 22 16 to receive delivery on Tue 25th Jul 2017

The Print It's Promise

The Print It's Promise

Customer Reviews

"Our NCR sets arrived today and all is in order. Thank you.…"

Clara Klein - London, Tottenham 13/07/2017 -

"Very pleased with the quality.…"

Abdirahman Ahmed - London, N16 11/07/2017 -

"Good adhesion. Nice printing.…"

Graeme Wearden - Salford, Greater Manche 06/07/2017 -

"Delighted with the service and Print It delivered real savings on postage. Recommend it gladly.…"

Jemima Wilson - London, Edmonton 05/07/2017 -

"Good quality labels.…"

Hemanth Vudayaraju - London, Camden 04/07/2017 -

"The binding on the directories are very durable.…"

Ryan Adams - Slough, Berkshire 30/06/2017 -

"Very good quality prints.…"

Anurag Saxena - Poole, Dorset 29/06/2017 -

"Really glad I used Print It for our invoice books. After a disastrous experience at a different printer, this was bliss…"

Charlotte Pfahl - Hinckley, Leicestershi 28/06/2017 -

"Quality printing on quality materials. Great.…"

Aditya Moorthy - Elmbridge, Surrey 28/06/2017 -

"Superb quality.…"

Vijaya Vardhan - London, N18 28/06/2017 -

Print It's Video

Print It's Video

Request Sample Pack

Our sample pack helps you decide which paper and finish is right for your print job.

Design Service

Our experienced creative team can add a professional design to your literature.

What We Print

We print a whole range of products - in fact there is not much we don't print!